When was it built?

The foundation stone was laid on March 28th 1854 with Percy Chapel officially opening on 13th December 1854.

Who designed it?

Percy Chapel was built to the design of H. E. and A. S. Goodridge.

What was it built for?

At the time of opening, Percy Chapel was described as “a new Independent Chapel for the accommodation of the members of the late Mr Jay’s congregation who seceded from Argyle Chapel, shortly after his retirement.”

Why was it called Percy Chapel?

As a mark of respect to Rev. William Jay, the new chapel was called Percy Chapel, after his residence – Percy Place.

Special design features?

The building is grade II* listed and is noted to be of outstanding historical and architectural interest.

“The site offered great difficulties, being limited in extent and irregular in plan, and the form of the building internally was wholly determined by the shape of the ground.  This apparent awkwardness, however, was entirely overcome by the peculiarity of its treatment.  The plan of the chapel somewhat resembles the form as a horse shoe, but the principal feature is a decagonal lantern, upwards of 40 feet in diameter, rising above the side walls to a height of nearly 70 feet to the top of the turret, it is supported by ten semi-circular stone arches on lofty columns of polished Purbeck stone. Round the sides of the lantern are 40 windows, four in each side. There are three wheel windows, nine feet in diameter, on the side and end walls.”

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, 8th April 1916